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Many Places Named To Honor Flagler

Q: How many places in Palm Beach County are named for Henry Flagler, the Godfather of Palm Beach?
A: Flagler may have left his mark on the region, but he didn’t name anything for himself.
However, plenty of things are named for him now. There is the Henry Morrison Flagler Museum, his former mansion. And that was always called Whitehall until it became a museum in 1959, executive director John Blades said recently.
Other legacies: Flagler Drive, the boulevard along the Intracoastal Waterway in West Palm Beach, and the Flagler Memorial Bridge – the north bridge to Palm Beach. The bridge leads to Royal Poinciana Way, which was named Flagler Avenue when Flagler was alive, says John Blades, the executive director at Flagler Museum.
The official Palm Beach County map book lists plenty more streets: Flagler Boulevard, Flagler Court, Flagler Lane, Flagler Parkway, Flagler Way, Flagler Estates Drive, Flagler Manor Circle, and Flagler Promenade.
An Internet “Yellow Pages” search finds about 20 listings, all of them in or close to West Palm Beach. Most have the name simply by virtue of being on Flagler Drive: Courtyards On Flagler, Jefferson at Flagler (residential), Flagler Yacht Club Condominium, Flagler Montessori Pre-School, Flagler Outpatient Center, Flagler Medical Associates, Flagler Realty & Development, Flagler Institute for Rehabilitation, Flagler Inn. Others: Flagler Title, Flagler Auto Brokers, Flagler House Condominium, Flagler Court Hotel, Flagler’s Oceanview Grille, First Flagler Mortgage, Flagler Home Corporation, Flagler Square.
Then there’s the Flagler System, a corporation with numerous real estate holdings, including one very special property: the old man’s showcase, The Breakers.
Henry Morrison Flagler Museum: 655-2833.
Read More: Henry Flagler, Visionary of the Gilded Age, by Sidney Martin.
Readers: The Sept. 18 column on John Stretch, the late recreation director for the Central and South Florida Flood Control District, for whom a park near Belle Glade is named, prompted a call from Ruth Raith of North Palm Beach. Her late husband was Ed Dail, the district’s executive director in the 1960s and 1970s. Raith points out that a mistake was made in describing Stretch’s family. An obituary was misread, which resulted in a daughter being misidentified as a granddaughter. Stretch actually had a son, a daughter-in-law and two daughters at the time of his death in 1970.

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Posted in Eliot Kleinberg October 9, 2002 at 10:17 am.

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